CBO Report Signals Cost Shifting to Employers

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CBO Report Signals Cost Shifting to Employers
Calendar15 March 2017

On Monday the CBO released its much-anticipated score of the American Health Care Act, the Republican legislation to repeal and replace the ACA. The CBO projection shows a loss in healthcare coverage for 24 million Americans over the next decade, accompanied by a reduction in the federal deficit of $337 billion. The state Medicaid programs are taking the biggest  hit, with a decrease in funding of $880 billion during the same time period. In the short term, the CBO projects that health insurance premiums in the individual market will increase 15-20% and 14 million fewer Americans will have coverage as soon as next year.

None of this bodes well for employer-sponsored medical plans. At the time the CBO score was released, I was speaking at the Society for Human Resource Management's 2017 Employment Law & Legislative Conference. We asked the employers in the audience to respond to a polling question – “If healthcare reform were to occur this year, what are your concerns?”  Overwhelmingly, the top concern was that a rise in the number of uninsured will lead to cost shifting by providers to employer-sponsored plans.

That was the theme of a recent article I co-authored with Terry Stone from Oliver Wyman. We argued that cost-shifting fails to address the underlying causes of cost growth – it may even worsen it. Moreover, increasing the cost burden on employers will simply make it harder for them to provide affordable coverage to the many millions of health consumers – 177 million, to be precise – who receive benefits through work. You can read more about our recommendations from health reform in this report.

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